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First Post Posted on: 04-07-13 01:16 PM next post first post
I was wondering how do you tell if the eggs are fertile without incubating them? I am referring to all kind of eggs - duck eggs, goose eggs, peafowl eggs, etc... Any suggestions?
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Reply #: 1 Posted on: 04-08-13 08:44 AM next post previous post
I'm sure there are ways to tell, but I have only been able to tell after i put them in the incubator..then after about 5 or 7 days i candle them and i can see the blood vessels in the fertile eggs..sometimes even the beginning of an embryo that is wiggling a bit right in the middle of the vessels.  Just candling them before putting into the incubator won't show anything but the clear egg and a yolk ..at least in my experience.  I'm sure there are people on here who may know how to tell with out incubating them first.
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Reply #: 2 Posted on: 04-08-13 11:51 AM next post previous post
If you have many, you can open a few and look for a white round spot (usualls a "bull's eye). If you see them then there is a good chance that the rest are fertile.
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Reply #: 3 Posted on: 04-08-13 11:43 PM next post previous post
Will the eggs that we buy from grocery stores be fertile?
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Reply #: 4 Posted on: 04-09-13 11:26 AM next post previous post
Thanks shicks and annemarie....
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Reply #: 5 Posted on: 04-09-13 03:49 PM next post previous post

Sorry shicks,  The eggs with bolld spots are just that, blood spots, not a sign of fertilization.  Also MOST eggs from the super market are NOT fertile. They are produced by egg farms where the poor chickens are fed a super feed to make them lay more, lights on 24 hours (sometimes, rarely, they turn off the lights for 2 or 3 hours. They are also in little cages probably 12" square, have  never even see a rooster or real sunlight and very few humans. They are on a floor of fencing material  so that their feces drop down to a conveyer belt and the eggs drop into another for processing.

If you get farm raised or organic eggs they MAY be fertile and are definitely much fresher.  I'm not sure of the time of freshness on the factory eggs but I believe that I read somewhere that the average age of the eggs at time of purchase is 2 or 3 months!

 

 

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Reply #: 6 Posted on: 04-09-13 03:50 PM next post previous post

Sorry shicks,  The eggs with bolld spots are just that, blood spots, not a sign of fertilization.  Also MOST eggs from the super market are NOT fertile. They are produced by egg farms where the poor chickens are fed a super feed to make them lay more, lights on 24 hours (sometimes, rarely, they turn off the lights for 2 or 3 hours. They are also in little cages probably 12" square, have  never even see a rooster or real sunlight and very few humans. They are on a floor of fencing material  so that their feces drop down to a conveyer belt and the eggs drop into another for processing.

If you get farm raised or organic eggs they MAY be fertile and are definitely much fresher.  I'm not sure of the time of freshness on the factory eggs but I believe that I read somewhere that the average age of the eggs at time of purchase is 2 or 3 months!

 

 

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Reply #: 7 Posted on: 04-09-13 04:29 PM next post previous post
I found this content on blood spots somewhere else!!

Blood spots occur when blood or a bit of tissue is released along with a yolk.  Each developing yolk in a hen's ovary is enclosed in a sack containing blood vessels that supply yolk building substances. When the yolk is mature, it is normally released from the only area of the yolk sac, called the "stigma" or "suture line", that is free of blood vessels.  Occasionally, the yolk sac ruptures at some other point, causing blood vessels to break and blood to appear on the yolk or in the white. As an egg ages, the blood spot becomes paler, so a bright blood spot is a sign that the egg is fresh.

Blood spots occur in less than one percent of all eggs laid.  They may appear in a pullet's first few eggs, but are more likely to occur as hens get older, indicating that it's time to cull.  Blood spots may be triggered by too little vitamin A in a hen's diet, or they may be hereditary - if you hatch replacement pullets from a hen that characteristically lays spotted eggs, your new flock will likely do the same.
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Reply #: 8 Posted on: 04-10-13 07:25 AM next post previous post
well, i learn something new every day..lol  20 years ago my mom told me that it was dead chickens..are you telling me that my mother was wrong?  OMG..what else might she have been wrong about?  lmao 
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Reply #: 9 Posted on: 04-10-13 06:50 PM last post previous post
Yes shicks.... I am learning a lot about ducks everyday from you too....
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